Rock used as doorstop revealed to be meteorite worth $100K

Rock used as doorstop for decades identified as $100K meteorite

Meteorite used as doorstop for decades worth $100,000

A man in MI discovered that the big hunk of malformed rock that was once propped open a door on a farm he bought is actually worth as much as $100,000.

A man has discovered a rock he's been using as a doorstop for 30 years is a meteorite worth more than $100,000.

Upon receiving the meteorite, Sirbescu evaluated it and discovered it was an iron-nickel meteorite, composed of 8 to 8.5 percent iron and 11.5 percent nickel. The farmer told Mazurek that he and his father watched the chunk of rock slam into their property one night and picked it up the next day, when it was still warm to the touch.

"I could tell right away that this was something special", she said, noting that it's the sixth-largest meteorite found in MI.

According to Central Michigan University, the 22-pound meteorite rock was brought in to be examined by an unnamed man who said he had been using it as a doorstop for several decades.

Central Michigan University The meteorite was reportedly found on a farm in Edmore, Michigan, in the 1930s.

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The farmer said that it had come down onto the property in the '30s - "and it made a heck of a noise when it hit", the new owner recalled him saying, according to CMU's statement.

Sirbescu sent a small sample to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC for further analysis where it was estimated the meteorite could be worth around $100,000.

The new owner lived on the farm a few years, and when he moved, he took the mystery rock with him.

David says the man who sold him the barn described the incredible tale of the meteorite making an impact crater in the backyard.

"Just think, what I was holding is a piece of the early solar system that literally fell into our hands", she said. "I wonder what mine is worth", Mazurek said in the release.

Now, the space rock, dubbed Edmore meteorite, is waiting to find a permanent home. The Smithsonian is considering purchasing the meteorite and adding it to the museum's collection. If a sale goes through, the man has agreed to give 10% of the sale value to the university for the study of earth and atmospheric sciences.

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