US Open champion Naomi Osaka reveals what Serena Williams told her

Tennis Umpires Are Reportedly Considering Boycott of Serena Williams Matches After US Open Incident

Report: Tennis Umpires Mulling Boycott Of Serena Williams Matches

The row shows no signs of going away as fellow American legend of the sport Billie Jean King came out in support of Serena's sexism claims this week, saying in the aftermath of the final: "When a woman is emotional, she's "hysterical" and she's penalised for it".

"This is bulls-t, for umpires, being women or men doesn't matter", Strycova told Czech website Sport.CZ. Viewers could not have guessed that she won by looking at her crestfallen, teary-eyed expression throughout the immediate aftermath of the match.

Ramos was unperturbed, and Williams' rage continued: she was soon given a point penalty for smashing and making bits of her racket. Strycova asked. "I find it interesting that she did it only when she was losing".

"I didn't know Ramos was sitting in the chair".

Osaka was born in Osaka, Japan, in 1997 to a Haitian-American father and a Japanese mother, before the family moved to the US when she was three.

The Japanese player's breakthrough triumph in NY was overshadowed by an explosive row between her opponent Serena Williams and umpire Carlos Ramos. Williams was outraged, and demanded an apology, telling Ramos that "I don't cheat to win, I'd rather lose".

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Serena had received a warning, a point penalty, and a game penalty after an outburst that saw her call the umpire Carlos Ramos a thief. How many other men do things? She was one of the main reasons that tennis chose to investigate video replay technology on the courts after several bad calls went against her in the 2004 US Open quarterfinals, she has been described as "scary" to look at by the president of the Russian Tennis Federation, she has been handed penalties that wouldn't otherwise have been given to men.

These standards are not applied to the young men my age who instead of being emotional, they are branded "passionate", instead of ranting are "speaking their minds" and if he speaks arrogantly speaks of his achievements he is said to be "confident" and an "ambitious" is not used as a complement.

The International Tennis Federation supported Ramos in a statement released Monday, saying that his decisions were "in accordance with the relevant rules and were re-affirmed by the US Open's decision to fine Serena Williams for the three offenses".

"We can not measure ourselves by what we think we should also be able to get away with".

She described Williams' behavior on court as "out of line".

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