Trump mocks Obama for doubting his economic plan

White House adviser admits Trump got his facts wrong in economy tweet

Kevin Hassett, chairperson of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, acknowledged the claim was wrong after media organisations including Bloomberg News published historical data showing the benchmark had been passed many times since 1948.

On Monday morning, Trump claimed on Twitter that "The GDP Rate (4.2%) is higher than the Unemployment Rate (3.9%) for the first time in over 100 years!"

"Since 1948, there have been 63 quarters with a GDP growth rate higher than avg quarterly unemployment rate", Fox News Research wrote in a tweet, listing the most recent quarters with GDP growth higher than the unemployment rate as Q2 2018 and Q1 2006.

"President Obama vs. President Trump, the leader vs. the tweeter, yes we can vs. way too tan".

But Trump's mention of Obama's comments about a "magic wand" appear to reference a June 2016 town-hall event in IN when the former president was asked about Trump's promise to kick-start manufacturing jobs in the country. Well, it depends on who you ask.

Barack Obama makes first post-presidency trip to Africa
Barack Obama makes first post-presidency trip to Africa

Hassett said the correct statement the president should have made is that the GDP rate rising above the unemployment rate had not happened in 10 years. "And at some point somebody probably conveyed it to him adding a zero to that and they shouldn't have done that".

Here's Hassett explaining how historians will "100 percent accept the fact" that the economy improved after Trump's election.

This wasn't the first time Hassett has weighed in on a presidential tweet.

Last week, The Washington Post counted 4,713 false or misleading claims by the president since he took office ― an average of eight per day.

But as he answered a question from a reporter about Trump's tweet, he also bashfully recalled an earlier incident when he gave Sanders a "bad number".

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